What Must Be Done to Boost the Educational Condition in the Philippines

What Must Be Done to Boost the Educational Condition in the Philippines

 

By June 2020, nearly 9 million students will be enrolled in private, public, and virtual schools.

More than 9 million students will have enrolled to attend school online classes in public and private settings by June 2020. The new enrollment period was already set to end on August 24th, which is why the DepEd is delaying the start of classes until June to prepare for the resumption of classes. Beginning in August, the department will be limited to using only a portion of the month for this reason.

Briones, the Education Minister, was taken aback by the fact that attendance nearly doubled her predictions. Given that the number of Filipino families with school-aged children is likely to vary and that if everyone refused to vaccinate their children, public health would suffer. The CO19 vaccination program was planned to account for all social, technical, and other variations. Because of all of these variables, 5 million children will likely be excluded from enrollment statistics. As announced by Bishop Roberto Mallari, chairman of the Philippines’ Episcopal Commission on the New Liturgical Movement and Social Action, stating that a sizable number of families “Catechist-Arts of the Poor”, Filipinos do not have the financial or technological infrastructure to sustain it.” Teachers may be unable to obtain the tools required to access technology. The technology itself may be insufficient for them. However, many educators have not been adequately prepared for the future they now face.

There is also the issue of interoperability to consider. According to the DICT, Wi-Fi is currently unavailable in places where students must fly kilometers across rivers and long before a pandemic strikes.

For several years, it has been a source of concern in Philippine education that social
status and access to opportunity have historically been segregated. Students who live in major cities with adequate funding or some affluent suburbs have better access to private and higher-quality schools. In contrast, those who live in rural areas receive fewer services, restricting their educational options even more.

Despite their celebrity, most former celebrities do not seem to have reaped substantial benefits from their place of privilege. According to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), they are among the 15-year-old students in the OECD. The latter does the worst in reading comprehension, which means that if current trends persist, the majority of countries in this area will be substantially better off by the turn of the century. In addition to the 98 percent literacy rate, only a few of the students polled, who claim to come from a world where most adults supposedly have a high standard of education, came close to succeeding in science and mathematics: they were ranked 78th out of all countries in academic achievement.

Many people have argued that the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) findings are incorrect because those who took the test were disproportionately from public school systems and cannot accurately reflect the inequalities between private and public education. Whether or not these types of solutions result in educational excellence contributes to the current crisis in the Philippine education system. The vast majority of Filipinos are illiterate in math and reading. Since it is so foreign, many people fail to understand science, whereas mathematics is commonly dismissed.

According to a 2017 survey conducted by a major global news organization, the average Filipino over the age of 16 had the third-lowest level of information about critical national issues than people of 36 other countries. This also highlights the epidemic of reality- and logic-challenged blog posts popular on social media sites in the Philippines. The election results are notable but less critical because they primarily focus on Filipinos’ feelings and opinions.

Poor students in the Philippines have been reported to face several disadvantages, including a lack of access to books and facilities. Although the opposite issue (poverty) occurs, the difference between rich and developing countries continues. Furthermore, if education is a high-priority program, the least developed countries would invest heavily in it. In the 2018 PISA, Chinese students from provinces with lower household wealth concerning per-person GDP income performed better than Western European countries.

Even the poorest Southeast Asian nations, such as the Philippines, Malaysia, Indonesia, and Vietnam, spend less on education than neighboring Thailand, Singapore, Vietnam, Indonesia, and Laos. The majority of the annual budget is allocated to education, at least as mandated by then-current United Nations treaties. However, even after all obligations are fulfilled, it is still 3.4 percent of GDP or less due to recent Constitutional amendments that reduced the proportion allocated by UNTAC. Even in Congress, they cut the planned 2020 budget for the Department of Education, acknowledging that they would require more classrooms and teachers in the coming year.

There is no need to detail here: Public education expansion is essential for a country’s school infrastructure and teachers to increase education and student achievement. Most schools in the modern age lack not only computers but also whiteboards and instructional equipment. Along with reductions in state funding for public education, there is a relative shortage of public school teachers, who earn among the lowest salaries among all state employees while carrying significant responsibilities.

It must be said that Filipino students’ low performance in these three areas is undeniably concerning. The overwhelming majority of the Filipino people are uninterested in and dismissive of education. Their ignorance compares with their desire for the country’s democratization and advancement in national affairs. People who cannot make sound decisions due to a lack of detailed knowledge of the issues or a lack of education about how the world works are more likely to become victims of corrupt, illegal, or ineffective government.

The abysmal state of education in the Philippines lays the basis for the perceived fragility of what we see. This has never been officially proven, but it is generally thought to be the case. Indeed, the best way is to keep the populace unaware of those facts and circumstances. Regardless of your intelligence, if you refuse to follow the rule, you will eventually end up with incompetent and self-serving governments.

The COVID-19 virus has become more dangerous. The educational system cannot continue to rely exclusively on face-to-face instruction. To adapt to these newly designed and challenging challenges, “blended, “flexible” learning” must depart from existing practices.

The more affluent and well-trained schools are now employing various strategies to solve the difficulties that come with increased skill. Leading universities in the Philippines, including the University of the Visayas and the Ateneo de Manila University, also introduce tailored approaches to represent better and train their students and faculty. While institutions and programs at the K-12 and a few above are generally considered comparable, there is still a substantial gap in training and skills at Tertiary institutions and the majority levels.

The shift to online learning has intensified long-standing issues in Philippine education, making them significantly more complicated. The root of these difficulties may be a concern that elementary, secondary, and tertiary educational institutions are not adequately ensuring their students’ ability to read and comprehend material, or they may be doubting their students’ ability to demonstrate the dedication required for acquiring the vital information they have entrusted to them in the form of learners. According to the current state of education, the actual state of education in the Philippines is about to hit an all-time high due to the COVID19 crisis.

At this point, we established that:
  • What Must Be Done to Boost the Educational Condition in the Philippines By June 2020, nearly 9 million students will be enrolled in private, public, and virtual schools.
  • More than 9 million students will have enrolled to attend school online classes in public and private settings by June 2020.
  • The new enrollment period was already set to end on August 24th, which is why the DepEd is delaying the start of classes until June to prepare for the resumption of classes.
  • Many people have argued that the PISA findings are incorrect because those who took the test were disproportionately from public school systems and cannot accurately reflect the inequalities between private and public education.
  • The vast majority of Filipinos are illiterate in math and reading, according to the study.

Author: TMTanedo

TMTanedo is a graduate of AB Political Science major in Policy Management at the University of Makati, Philippines. He earned 52 units in Master in Business Administration at the Cavite State University, Imus Campus. He is privately employed in the Healthcare Service, a content creator, a blogger, and a website designer.